mountain graphic

Inspired by Scott? You can support his team.

Want to inspire others? We’re making it simple to start your own walk.

Trail Talks
Follow Scott’s reflections during his 500-mile hike, beginning June 25.

Each day he’s on the trail, Scott will share uplifting thoughts on the walk as a metaphor for life, and the journey we’re on together to bring hope to kids in hard places.

Numbers: Day 27, Mile 300

The numbers – miles ahead or kids in need – can feel overwhelming. Until we remember one important fact.

Read More >
Never Alone: Day 25, Mile 283

Remembering today that, even in the middle of nowhere with coyotes nearby, none of us is ever really alone.

Read More >
Gratitude: Day 23, Mile 250.2

Grateful for being past the halfway point!  And grateful for good people along the trail, like Rob – a stranger that was willing to help when it was needed.

Read More >
Frontier Ranch: Day 20, Mile 228

Visiting a place that had life-changing impact years ago, in the company of a lifelong friend, is a reminder to honor someone who made a difference in our lives, and to be that kind of person to a kid in our own sphere of influence today.

Read More >
Mountain Springs: Day 19, Mile 216

Mountain Springs are refreshing. And so are these words from friends and leaders at Mountain Springs Church who are walking a portion of the trail with us.

Read More >
Oxygen: Day 18, Mile 200

Hiking at 12,000 feet with smoke in the air can make us consider the quality of what we’re breathing in – through the culture around us as well as the air.

Read More >
Legacy: Day 16, Mile 154

In the remote wilderness stands a legacy of stone and wood. Thoughts about legacy lead us to ask, “Do we produce, or do we consume? And what can we leave behind that makes the world a better place?”

Read More >
Identity: Day 13, Mile 127

The surprising discovery that it’s the custom on the trail to use “trail names” spurred thoughts about identity. What would your trail name be? More importantly, where is your identity?

Read More >
“Freedom” Day 11: Mile 113

The 4th of July on trail #1776 inspired thoughts about Freedom. Freedom is not just being able to do what you want – that can be slavery. Freedom is a state of mind that comes from knowing who you are, that you are loved by God. Freedom is a liberation from yourself, that allows you to love. It’s the freedom we read of in Galatians 5:1 “It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery.”

Read More >
Milestones: Day 10, Mile 100

Today is a special milestone on this 500-mile journey. On the trail, as in life, it’s important that we take time to celebrate milestone, even when there is a lot of trail still ahead of us.

Read More >
Hail: Day 8, Mile 85

Hardships and hazards along the trail are reminders of what’s involved when we set out to do hard things.

Read More >
Rhythm of Rest: Day 7, Mile 72

A day of rest along the trail inspires thoughts about how rest, dependency and productivity are connected, and whether the same principle applies everywhere.

Read More >
Restoration: Day 6, Mile 58

Why is mile marker 58 so meaningful? This Trail Talk explains the deep significance of this number to the work we’re doing for kids in hard places.

Read More >
Lost Creek Wilderness – Day 5, Mile 43

On the trail, you can’t take anything for granted. The importance of basic necessities brought to mind what, until recently, was the number one killer of young children, and the work we still have ahead in this area.

Read More >
Storm: Day 1 Mile 15

Day 1 ended with a storm.

Read More >
Grace? Training Day 1

Sometimes when I’m hiking solo in the backcountry I think about bears or mountain lions or other risks, but I don’t tend to worry about the type of encounter I had today. A lot of friends have encouraged me to carry when I’m solo but I never have. I wonder what you would have done?

Read More >
Trying vs Training: Day Zero

Training day. Today I am covering 10 miles with full pack and 1600 vertical feet at elevation of 8500 – a fairly light day to prepare me for the 500 mile trek from Denver to Durango. Today I’ve been thinking about training, about readiness for the trial, about how training is so different from “trying.”

Life will inevitably test us. In this world you will have trouble. How do we prepare for the moment of the test so that we respond well to the tough circumstances of life?

To follow Jesus is to live according to his way of living, to imitate him as an apprentice. The regular practices or habits of our faith – prayer, study of scripture, fasting, solitude, Sabbath etc, are vital to the life of a disciple. But they are not an end in themselves, that would be religion. Instead, these practices of the abiding life are used by God to transform our minds, to renew us and reshape us, so that when we face the test, the character of Christ is revealed in us.

We do not study to study well, or fast to fast well. Instead, the “spiritual disciplines” are a form of training.

A mentor once gave me a simple axiom, “The test is not the test. Your response to the test is the test.” We don’t have an option to go through life without challenges but we can be prepared to handle them well. We train our minds and hearts to be ready for them so that in the moment of the test our “natural instinct “ (new nature) is toward patience instead of anger, toward grace instead of judgement, toward humility instead of pride – for others more than for ourself.

I guess I could just show up at the trailhead and “try really hard” to finish the hike, but that’s not likely to go well! Instead, I am training for a 40 day, 500 mile trek through the wilderness. I hope my training prepares me to finish well but, even if I can’t finish, I won’t regret a single step because I’m doing this hike to raise awareness and support for kids in poverty. This cause, those kids, deserve everything I can offer. They are the “why” of the hike and remembering why is an important part of readiness.

I am also grateful to know that I am not alone. I’m doing this “walk” as part of a global community of Child Champions who are walking in solidarity with those who serve kids in hard places.

We would love to have you as part of our community. Walk with Us!

Read More >
Get Scott’s trail updates in your inbox.

And join the global conversation in our Walk With Us Facebook group.
Sartaj Ali

Sartaj and his family live in an impoverished community where there are not many resources, but because of the center, he has opportunities and the chance to pursue a career as an accountant. Until he can reach this goal, Sartaj is content to complete his homework, play cricket with friends, explore new parts of town, or help with chores such as fetching water. This joyful and considerate teenager looks forward to English class the most out of all his courses, and he prays for peace and protection.

See more children like Sartaj
Shivani Yadav

Shivani loves attending activities at the center where Child Champions offer vital resources, love, and support. In her prayers, she asks God to give her knowledge and new dresses. This sensitive and nurturing girl is determined to become a teacher someday but for now is focused on studying for school and learning English vocabulary words. At home, Shivani can frequently be seen assisting with household chores and errands, reading books, eating a delicious mango for a snack, or playing Kho Kho outside with friends.

See more children like Shivani
Kidus Hailu

Kidus is discovering more about God’s everlasting love at Sunday school and prays for blessings on his education. When he is done assisting with household chores, this sociable and spirited young man has fun taking part in soccer matches against friends. At school, Kidus studies hard in all his classes and especially enjoys learning the English language. He aspires to be a doctor when he is grown, and thanks to the support and encouragement he receives from devoted Child Champions, this dream can become a reality.

See more children like Kidus
Mekdes Getu

Science is Mekdes’s favorite school subject because she understands it well. At home, she is glad to lend a hand by running errands and cleaning before having fun drawing and coloring pictures or jumping rope with friends from the neighborhood. Mekdes eagerly attends spiritual programs every week, is maturing in her understanding of Christ’s love, and prays for God to help her be a good student so that she can become a doctor one day. Thanks to the support she receives at the center, this cheerful, outgoing teen can strive toward her goals.

See more children like Mekdes
Jestin Kumaramchirayil

Although Jestin and his loved ones live in extreme poverty, they know he faces a promising future thanks to the guidance and resources he receives at the center. The encouragement and support provided by generous Child Champions inspire him to dream of becoming a teacher someday, but until then, this active, considerate, and cheerful young man stays busy reading stories in his favorite English class and buying household necessities for his family. When there’s time for fun, Jestin enjoys drawing and coloring or playing cricket and soccer with friends.

See more children like Jestin
One Mile for One Child Walk With Us

Support Scott’s team to discover the various ways you can help us reach our goal of support for 500 kids.

SUPPORT SCOTT'S TEAM
Meet some of the kids and Child Champions Scott is walking in solidarity with.
trail map

One mile for one child.

For every mile of the trail, we’ve chosen a child who is currently enrolled at a OneChild Hope Center but still needs a sponsor.

390
Miles Walked
312
Kids Supported
SPONSOR
trail map

Altitude sickness, injury, exhaustion: Scott will face many challenges as he hikes the Colorado Trail 500 miles from Denver to Durango. But you can help keep him moving and keep the community moving toward our goal: support for 500 kids.

You can join in easily from anywhere, and you won’t have to worry about lightning, rockfalls, or probably even blisters!

One Mile for One Child Walk With Us

“Children are innocent and deserve a better world. Sometimes I feel overwhelmed by the horrible things kids go through. But there are heroes who inspire me – teachers, coaches, counselors who give of themselves so that kids can thrive. I’m doing this walk for those who work in the slums, the back alleys, the remote villages – for those bringing hope to kids in hard places.”

Scott C. Todd, PhD  |  President, OneChild

mountain graphic

Scott's team sets off on June 25 to walk 500 miles to raise support for 500 kids.

Scott's Walk
SCROLL UP
One Child - Walk With Us
Watch the Video
Your Walk
SCROLL DOWN INSTEAD
shield icon
Walk a mile together for kids in hard places.

The Child Champions who help kids living in poverty walk in hard places as they work. This summer, we're walking in solidarity with them. We invite you, our global community, to join us in walking, or moving in whatever way works best for you, as we bring hope to our kids.

Walk in a manner worthy of the calling you have received.
EPHESIANS 4:1
Meet some of the kids and Child Champions Scott is walking in solidarity with.
Paying it Forward

A Honduran college student shares what sponsorship meant to her and why she is giving back.

Read about this Child Champion
A Name and a Future

One woman’s resolve to rescue an HIV-positive infant has grown to give thousands of orphans in Kenya loving families.

Read about this Child Champion
Prayers and Planes

Grief turns to joy as sponsorship in Zimbabwe brings new purpose to a woman’s life.

Read about this Child Champion
OneChild

Research indicates that one-to-one child sponsorship is one of the most effective ways to combat global poverty.

Sponsorship makes it possible for kids to receive education and life-changing child development opportunities, which help them become leaders within their communities.

Your monthly financial support empowers staff in the field to equip children to become healthy, self-sufficient adults.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR MODEL
Scott's Walk
mountain graphic white
OneChild President Scott Todd has set himself a goal of walking 500 miles at 10,000’ of elevation on the Colorado Trail.
Scott is challenging our community to raise support for 500 kids—one child for every mile he walks.
110
Miles to Go
312
Kids Supported
You can help.
Here’s where to start…
Walk one mile for one child.
It takes less than 30 minutes to calmly walk a mile, but it only takes a moment on that walk to spark life-changing hope.
Every $460 raised supports one child, for a year.

Thank you corporate event sponsors.